Teduglutide has been described as an effective treatment for parenteral support (PS) reduction in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, a quantitative summary of the available evidence is still lacking. PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane library, OVID, and CINAHL databases were systematically searched up to July 2021 for studies reporting the rate of response (defined as a ≥20% reduction in PS) to teduglutide among PS-dependent adult patients. The rate of weaning (defined as the achievement of PS independence) was also evaluated as a secondary end-point. Ten studies were finally considered in the meta-analysis. Pooled data show a response rate of 64% at 6 months, 77% at 1 year and, 82% at ≥2 years; on the other hand, the weaning rate could be estimated as 11% at 6 months, 17% at 1 year, and 21% at ≥2 years. The presence of colon in continuity reduced the response rate (−17%, 95%CI: (−31%, −3%)), but was associated with a higher weaning rate (+16%, 95%CI: (+6%, +25%)). SBS etiology, on the contrary, was not found to be a significant predictor of these outcomes, although a nonsignificant trend towards both higher response rates (+9%, 95%CI: (−8%, +27%)) and higher weaning rates (+7%, 95%CI: (−14%, +28%)) could be observed in patients with Crohn’s disease. This was the first meta-analysis that specifically assessed the efficacy of teduglutide in adult patients with SBS. Our results provide pooled estimates of response and weaning rates over time and identify intestinal anatomy as a significant predictor of these outcomes.

Efficacy of Teduglutide for Parenteral Support Reduction in Patients with Short Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Bioletto F.;D'eusebio C.;Merlo F. D.;Aimasso U.;Ossola M.;Pellegrini M.;Ponzo V.;Chiarotto A.;De Francesco A.;Ghigo E.;Bo S.
2022

Abstract

Teduglutide has been described as an effective treatment for parenteral support (PS) reduction in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, a quantitative summary of the available evidence is still lacking. PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane library, OVID, and CINAHL databases were systematically searched up to July 2021 for studies reporting the rate of response (defined as a ≥20% reduction in PS) to teduglutide among PS-dependent adult patients. The rate of weaning (defined as the achievement of PS independence) was also evaluated as a secondary end-point. Ten studies were finally considered in the meta-analysis. Pooled data show a response rate of 64% at 6 months, 77% at 1 year and, 82% at ≥2 years; on the other hand, the weaning rate could be estimated as 11% at 6 months, 17% at 1 year, and 21% at ≥2 years. The presence of colon in continuity reduced the response rate (−17%, 95%CI: (−31%, −3%)), but was associated with a higher weaning rate (+16%, 95%CI: (+6%, +25%)). SBS etiology, on the contrary, was not found to be a significant predictor of these outcomes, although a nonsignificant trend towards both higher response rates (+9%, 95%CI: (−8%, +27%)) and higher weaning rates (+7%, 95%CI: (−14%, +28%)) could be observed in patients with Crohn’s disease. This was the first meta-analysis that specifically assessed the efficacy of teduglutide in adult patients with SBS. Our results provide pooled estimates of response and weaning rates over time and identify intestinal anatomy as a significant predictor of these outcomes.
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Chronic intestinal failure; Parenteral nutrition; Parenteral support; Short bowel syndrome; Teduglutide; Adult; Gastrointestinal Agents; Humans; Parenteral Nutrition; Peptides; Short Bowel Syndrome
Bioletto F.; D'eusebio C.; Merlo F.D.; Aimasso U.; Ossola M.; Pellegrini M.; Ponzo V.; Chiarotto A.; De Francesco A.; Ghigo E.; Bo S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1861357
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