Background The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) is listed in the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria as a tool apt to measure the understanding of others' mental states. People diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) showed poorer performances on the RMET than healthy controls. Less data are available concerning other eating disorders. Methods Systematic review of four major databases from inception to July 15, 2021 following the PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analysis of cross-sectional observational studies comparing the scores of the RMET between patients with eating disorders and age- and-gender matched control groups. Results Out of 21 studies, we retrieved 29 independent samples of patients diagnosed with an eating disorder. Patients with active AN (n = 580) showed worse performances on the RMET than controls (n = 1019). Year of publication accounted for 61% of the (substantial: I-2 = 81%) heterogeneity in the meta-analysis. Earlier studies were more likely to find worse performances on the RMET of patients with active AN than later studies. Patients with bulimia nervosa (n = 185) performed poorly as compared to controls (n = 249), but the results were not statistically significant on the random-effect model. Obese patients with binge-eating disorder (n = 54) did not differ on the RMET from obese controls (n = 52). Patients with eating disorder not otherwise specified (n = 57) showed minimal differences compared to controls (n = 96). Study quality was good in six studies only. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders do not suffer from an impaired understanding of others' mental states, except for a still-to-be-identified subgroup of patients with active AN.

Affective cognition in eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the performance on the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Test

Preti, Antonio;Marzola, Enrica;Abbate Daga, Giovanni
2022

Abstract

Background The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) is listed in the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria as a tool apt to measure the understanding of others' mental states. People diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) showed poorer performances on the RMET than healthy controls. Less data are available concerning other eating disorders. Methods Systematic review of four major databases from inception to July 15, 2021 following the PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analysis of cross-sectional observational studies comparing the scores of the RMET between patients with eating disorders and age- and-gender matched control groups. Results Out of 21 studies, we retrieved 29 independent samples of patients diagnosed with an eating disorder. Patients with active AN (n = 580) showed worse performances on the RMET than controls (n = 1019). Year of publication accounted for 61% of the (substantial: I-2 = 81%) heterogeneity in the meta-analysis. Earlier studies were more likely to find worse performances on the RMET of patients with active AN than later studies. Patients with bulimia nervosa (n = 185) performed poorly as compared to controls (n = 249), but the results were not statistically significant on the random-effect model. Obese patients with binge-eating disorder (n = 54) did not differ on the RMET from obese controls (n = 52). Patients with eating disorder not otherwise specified (n = 57) showed minimal differences compared to controls (n = 96). Study quality was good in six studies only. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders do not suffer from an impaired understanding of others' mental states, except for a still-to-be-identified subgroup of patients with active AN.
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Anorexia nervosa; Binge eating disorder; Bulimia nervosa; Meta-analysis; Social cognition; Theory of Mind
Preti, Antonio; Siddi, Sara; Marzola, Enrica; Abbate Daga, Giovanni
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1873153
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