Late effects of cancer and its treatments during childhood or adolescence can impact work placement and increase the risk of unemployment. The aim of this study is to describe the work placement and the perceived job and economic satisfaction of long-term childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Jobs have been categorized according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations version 08 (ISCO-08), and satisfaction has been evaluated through the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). Out of 240 CCS (female = 98) included: 53 were students, 46 were unemployed and 141 were employed. Within unemployed survivors, 89.13% were affected by late effects (n = 41). The presence of at least one severe late effect was significantly associated with the probability of unemployment (OR 3.21; 95% CI 1.13–9.12, p < 0.050), and having any late effect was inversely related to the level of satisfaction of the financial situation of unemployed CCS (b −35.47; 95% CI −59.19, −11.74, p = 0.004). Our results showed that being a survivor with severe comorbidities has a significantly negative impact on occupation and worsens the perception of satisfaction of economic situations. Routinary follow-up care of CCS should include the surveillance of socioeconomic development and provide interventions, helping them to reach jobs suitable for their health.

Work Placement and Job Satisfaction in Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors: The Impact of Late Effects

Godono A.;Castiglione A.;Gatti F.;Clari M.;Conti A.;Zucchetti G.;Biasin E.;Varetto A.;Pira E.;Fagioli F.;Felicetti F.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Late effects of cancer and its treatments during childhood or adolescence can impact work placement and increase the risk of unemployment. The aim of this study is to describe the work placement and the perceived job and economic satisfaction of long-term childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Jobs have been categorized according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations version 08 (ISCO-08), and satisfaction has been evaluated through the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). Out of 240 CCS (female = 98) included: 53 were students, 46 were unemployed and 141 were employed. Within unemployed survivors, 89.13% were affected by late effects (n = 41). The presence of at least one severe late effect was significantly associated with the probability of unemployment (OR 3.21; 95% CI 1.13–9.12, p < 0.050), and having any late effect was inversely related to the level of satisfaction of the financial situation of unemployed CCS (b −35.47; 95% CI −59.19, −11.74, p = 0.004). Our results showed that being a survivor with severe comorbidities has a significantly negative impact on occupation and worsens the perception of satisfaction of economic situations. Routinary follow-up care of CCS should include the surveillance of socioeconomic development and provide interventions, helping them to reach jobs suitable for their health.
2022
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16
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childhood cancer survivors; job satisfaction; late effects; occupation; satisfaction profile; work placement
Dionisi-Vici M.; Godono A.; Castiglione A.; Gatti F.; Fortunati N.; Clari M.; Conti A.; Zucchetti G.; Biasin E.; Varetto A.; Pira E.; Fagioli F.; Brignardello E.; Felicetti F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1884602
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