African swine fever (ASF) is a severe haemorrhagic infectious disease affecting suids, thus representing a great economic concern. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis, rapid point of care testing (POCT) for ASF is highly demanded. In this work, we developed two strategies for the rapid onsite diagnosis of ASF, based on Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFIA) and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) techniques. The LFIA was a sandwich-type immunoassay exploiting a monoclonal antibody directed towards the p30 protein of the virus (Mab). The Mab was anchored onto the LFIA membrane to capture the ASFV and was also labelled with gold nanoparticles for staining the antibody-p30 complex. However, the use of the same antibody for capturing and as detector ligand showed a significant competitive effect for antigen binding, so required an experimental design to minimize reciprocal interference and maximize the response. The RPA assay, employing primers to the capsid protein p72 gene and an exonuclease III probe, was performed at 39 ◦C. The limit of detection of the method was assessed using a plasmid encoding the target gene and resulted in 5 copy/μL. The new LFIA and RPA were applied for ASFV detection in the animal tissues usually analysed by conventional assays (i.e., real-time PCR), such as kidney, spleen, and lymph nodes. A simple and universal virus extraction protocol was applied for sample preparation, followed by DNA extraction and purification for the RPA. The LFIA only required the addition of 3% H2O2 to limit matrix interference and prevent false positive results. The two rapid methods (25 min and 15 min were needed to complete the analysis for RPA and LFIA, respectively) showed high diagnostic specificity (100%) and sensitivity (93% and 87% for LFIA and RPA, respectively) for samples with high viral load (Ct < 27). False negative results were observed for samples with low viral load (Ct > 28) and/or also containing specific antibodies to ASFV, which decreased antigen availability and were indicative of a chronic, poorly transmissible infection. The simple and rapid sample preparation and the diagnostic performance of the LFIA suggested its large practical applicability for POC diagnosis of ASF.

Development of molecular and antigenic-based rapid tests for the identification of African swine fever virus in different tissues

S. Cavalera
;
B. Colitti
;
F. Feliziani;D. Scalas;A. Scollo;T. Serra;M. Chiarello;V. Testa;F. Di Nardo;C. Baggiani;S. Rosati;L. Anfossi
2023-01-01

Abstract

African swine fever (ASF) is a severe haemorrhagic infectious disease affecting suids, thus representing a great economic concern. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis, rapid point of care testing (POCT) for ASF is highly demanded. In this work, we developed two strategies for the rapid onsite diagnosis of ASF, based on Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFIA) and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) techniques. The LFIA was a sandwich-type immunoassay exploiting a monoclonal antibody directed towards the p30 protein of the virus (Mab). The Mab was anchored onto the LFIA membrane to capture the ASFV and was also labelled with gold nanoparticles for staining the antibody-p30 complex. However, the use of the same antibody for capturing and as detector ligand showed a significant competitive effect for antigen binding, so required an experimental design to minimize reciprocal interference and maximize the response. The RPA assay, employing primers to the capsid protein p72 gene and an exonuclease III probe, was performed at 39 ◦C. The limit of detection of the method was assessed using a plasmid encoding the target gene and resulted in 5 copy/μL. The new LFIA and RPA were applied for ASFV detection in the animal tissues usually analysed by conventional assays (i.e., real-time PCR), such as kidney, spleen, and lymph nodes. A simple and universal virus extraction protocol was applied for sample preparation, followed by DNA extraction and purification for the RPA. The LFIA only required the addition of 3% H2O2 to limit matrix interference and prevent false positive results. The two rapid methods (25 min and 15 min were needed to complete the analysis for RPA and LFIA, respectively) showed high diagnostic specificity (100%) and sensitivity (93% and 87% for LFIA and RPA, respectively) for samples with high viral load (Ct < 27). False negative results were observed for samples with low viral load (Ct > 28) and/or also containing specific antibodies to ASFV, which decreased antigen availability and were indicative of a chronic, poorly transmissible infection. The simple and rapid sample preparation and the diagnostic performance of the LFIA suggested its large practical applicability for POC diagnosis of ASF.
2023
258
1
10
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2023.124443
S.Cavalera; B.Colitti; G.M.De Mia; F.Feliziani; S.Dei Giudici; F.D'Errico; P.P.Angioi; D.Scalas; A.Scollo; T.Serra; M.Chiarello; V.Testa; F.Di Nardo; C.Baggiani; A.Oggiano; S.Rosati; L.Anfossi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1895772
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