Phosphorus (P) cycling in paddy soil is closely related to iron (Fe) redox wheel; its availability to rice has thus generally been ascribed to Fe minerals reductive dissolution. However, the literature aimed to identify the best method for predicting rice available P does not uniformly point to Fe reductants. Rice plants can indeed solubilize and absorb P through many strategies as a function of P supply, modifying the chemical environment. Therefore, this study aims to estimate P availability in paddy soils coupling the redox mechanisms driving P cycling with concurrent plant responses. Soil available P was estimated in three groups of paddy soils with low, medium, or high P content assessing easily desorbable pools (0.01 M calcium chloride, Olsen, Mehlich-III, anion exchanging resins) and Fe-bound P pools (EDTA, citrate-ascorbate, and oxalate). Rice P uptake and responses to P availability were assessed by a mesocosm cultivation trial. Although P released in porewater positively correlated with dissolved Fe(II), it did not with plant P uptake, and readily desorbable P pools were better availability predictors than Fe-bound pools, mainly because of the asynchrony observed between Fe reduction and plant P demand. Moreover, in low P soils, plants showed higher Fe(II) oxidation, enhanced root growth, and up-regulation of P root transporter encoding genes, plant responses being related with changes in P pools. These results indicate the generally assumed direct link between Fe reduction and rice P nutrition in paddy soils as an oversimplification, with rice P nutrition appearing as the result of a complex trade-off between soil redox dynamics, P content, and plant responses.

Assessing phosphorus availability in paddy soils: the importance of integrating soil tests and plant responses

Martinengo, S
First
;
Schiavon, M;Santoro, V;Said-Pullicino, D;Miniotti, EF;Celi, L;Martin, M
Last
2023-01-01

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) cycling in paddy soil is closely related to iron (Fe) redox wheel; its availability to rice has thus generally been ascribed to Fe minerals reductive dissolution. However, the literature aimed to identify the best method for predicting rice available P does not uniformly point to Fe reductants. Rice plants can indeed solubilize and absorb P through many strategies as a function of P supply, modifying the chemical environment. Therefore, this study aims to estimate P availability in paddy soils coupling the redox mechanisms driving P cycling with concurrent plant responses. Soil available P was estimated in three groups of paddy soils with low, medium, or high P content assessing easily desorbable pools (0.01 M calcium chloride, Olsen, Mehlich-III, anion exchanging resins) and Fe-bound P pools (EDTA, citrate-ascorbate, and oxalate). Rice P uptake and responses to P availability were assessed by a mesocosm cultivation trial. Although P released in porewater positively correlated with dissolved Fe(II), it did not with plant P uptake, and readily desorbable P pools were better availability predictors than Fe-bound pools, mainly because of the asynchrony observed between Fe reduction and plant P demand. Moreover, in low P soils, plants showed higher Fe(II) oxidation, enhanced root growth, and up-regulation of P root transporter encoding genes, plant responses being related with changes in P pools. These results indicate the generally assumed direct link between Fe reduction and rice P nutrition in paddy soils as an oversimplification, with rice P nutrition appearing as the result of a complex trade-off between soil redox dynamics, P content, and plant responses.
2023
59
4
391
405
Rice; Paddy soil; Reductive dissolution; Phosphorus availability; Anion exchanging resins
Martinengo, S; Schiavon, M; Santoro, V; Said-Pullicino, D; Romani, M; Miniotti, EF; Celi, L; Martin, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1900552
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