The KRIT1 gene has been associated with Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM), an autosomal dominant disease affecting cerebral microvasculature [1]. This gene encodes for a protein of 736 aa containing an NPXY motif, which mediates the interaction with ICAP1α (Integrin cytoplasmic associated protein 1α) [2], three ankyrin repeats, involved in protein-protein interactions, and a FERM domain, which is typical of proteins involved in the connection between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane [3]. Although the presence of these domains suggests that KRIT1 may behave as a scaffold protein and play a role in integrin signalling, the biological functions of this protein are poorly understood so far. By fluorescence microscopy analysis we found that KRIT1 can localize both in the nucleus, in the cytosol and at the plasma membrane. Moreover, using KRIT1B, an alternative splicing isoform recently identified in our lab [4], as well as several KRIT1 deletion mutants, we identified the regions of the protein that are important for its subcellular localization: in particular, we found that the FERM domain is important for the nuclear localization, as mutant forms of KRIT1 lacking distinct portions of the FERM domain are excluded from the nucleus. In the attempt to better understand KRIT1 functions, we performed a search for new molecular interactors using an yeast two hybrid screen approach. By screening a murine embryonal cDNA library with the C-terminus region of KRIT1, containing the FERM domain, as a bait, we identified KRIT1 interactors that localize either in the nucleus, in the cytoplasm or at the plasma membrane. The characterization of the functional significance of these molecular interactions is underway and should help elucidating the biological functions of KRIT1 as well as the molecular mechanisms of CCM pathogenesis. 1. Verlaan, D..J, et al., Cerebral cavernous malformations: mutations in Krit1. Neurology, 2002. 58: p. 853-857. 2. Zawistowski, J.S., et al., KRIT1 association with the integrin-binding protein ICAP-1: a new direction in the elucidation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM1) pathogenesis. Hum Mol Genet, 2002. 11(4): p. 389-96. 3. Lee, H.S., et al., Characterization of an actin-binding site within the talin FERM domain. J Mol Biol, 2004. 343(3): p. 771-84. 4. Retta, S.F., et al., Identification of Krit1B: a novel alternative splicing isoform of cerebral cavernous malformation gene-1. Gene, 2004. 325: p. 63-78.

Krit1 meets partners in distinct subcellular compartments through its “FERM” domain

FRANCALANCI, FLORIANA;AVOLIO, Maria;MARINO, Marco;DE LUCA, Elisa;DEGANI, Simona;BALZAC, Fiorella;TARONE, Guido;RETTA, Saverio Francesco
2006

Abstract

The KRIT1 gene has been associated with Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM), an autosomal dominant disease affecting cerebral microvasculature [1]. This gene encodes for a protein of 736 aa containing an NPXY motif, which mediates the interaction with ICAP1α (Integrin cytoplasmic associated protein 1α) [2], three ankyrin repeats, involved in protein-protein interactions, and a FERM domain, which is typical of proteins involved in the connection between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane [3]. Although the presence of these domains suggests that KRIT1 may behave as a scaffold protein and play a role in integrin signalling, the biological functions of this protein are poorly understood so far. By fluorescence microscopy analysis we found that KRIT1 can localize both in the nucleus, in the cytosol and at the plasma membrane. Moreover, using KRIT1B, an alternative splicing isoform recently identified in our lab [4], as well as several KRIT1 deletion mutants, we identified the regions of the protein that are important for its subcellular localization: in particular, we found that the FERM domain is important for the nuclear localization, as mutant forms of KRIT1 lacking distinct portions of the FERM domain are excluded from the nucleus. In the attempt to better understand KRIT1 functions, we performed a search for new molecular interactors using an yeast two hybrid screen approach. By screening a murine embryonal cDNA library with the C-terminus region of KRIT1, containing the FERM domain, as a bait, we identified KRIT1 interactors that localize either in the nucleus, in the cytoplasm or at the plasma membrane. The characterization of the functional significance of these molecular interactions is underway and should help elucidating the biological functions of KRIT1 as well as the molecular mechanisms of CCM pathogenesis. 1. Verlaan, D..J, et al., Cerebral cavernous malformations: mutations in Krit1. Neurology, 2002. 58: p. 853-857. 2. Zawistowski, J.S., et al., KRIT1 association with the integrin-binding protein ICAP-1: a new direction in the elucidation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM1) pathogenesis. Hum Mol Genet, 2002. 11(4): p. 389-96. 3. Lee, H.S., et al., Characterization of an actin-binding site within the talin FERM domain. J Mol Biol, 2004. 343(3): p. 771-84. 4. Retta, S.F., et al., Identification of Krit1B: a novel alternative splicing isoform of cerebral cavernous malformation gene-1. Gene, 2004. 325: p. 63-78.
Convegno Proteine 2006
Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (NO)
1-3 Giugno 2006
Convegno Proteine 2006 – Società Italiana di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare (SIB)
Società Italiana di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare
xx
xx
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http://www.biochimica.it/
KRIT1; Cerebral Cavernous Malformation; FERM domain; Nuclear localization
FRANCALANCI F; AVOLIO M; FERRO E; MARINO M; DE LUCA E; DEGANI S; BALZAC F; TARONE G; TRABALZINI L.; RETTA S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/19944
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