BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that fibrinogen clusters with several components of the metabolic syndrome, thus increasing its cardiovascular risk. The aims of the present study were to assess in a large population-based cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes (1) variables associated with fibrinogen and (2) the relationship between hyperfibrinogenemia, a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, and coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: We identified a cross-sectional, population-based cohort of 1574 patients with type 2 diabetes using multiple sources of ascertainment. Components of the metabolic syndrome were hypertension (systolic blood pressure > or = 160 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure > or = 95 mmHg and/or treatment with antihypertensive drugs), dyslipidemia (tryglicerides >2.82 mmol/l and/or HDL-cholesterol <1.03 mmol/l), hyperuricemia (uric acid >416 micromol/l) and increased albumin excretion rate (AER > or = 20 microg/min). RESULTS: Fibrinogen increases with age, HbA(1c), smoking, hypertension and a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, even after adjustment for confounders. Prevalence of CHD increases linearly across quartiles of fibrinogen (from 26.1 to 40.6%, p=0.046). However, in logistic regression, after adjustment for both confounders and known risk factors for CHD, the role of fibrinogen is no more significant, whereas ORs for HbA(1c) between 6.8 and 8.8% and >8.8% vs values <6.8% are, respectively, 1.91 (95% CI 1.36-2.69) and 1.56 (1.07-2.27). CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study shows that fibrinogen increases with age, HbA(1c), smoking, hypertension and a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, independent of major confounders. We also found that poor blood glucose control was associated with CHD.

Hyperfibrinogenemia and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes: a population-based study.

BRUNO, Graziella;CAVALLO PERIN, Paolo;PAGANO, Gian Franco
2001

Abstract

BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that fibrinogen clusters with several components of the metabolic syndrome, thus increasing its cardiovascular risk. The aims of the present study were to assess in a large population-based cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes (1) variables associated with fibrinogen and (2) the relationship between hyperfibrinogenemia, a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, and coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: We identified a cross-sectional, population-based cohort of 1574 patients with type 2 diabetes using multiple sources of ascertainment. Components of the metabolic syndrome were hypertension (systolic blood pressure > or = 160 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure > or = 95 mmHg and/or treatment with antihypertensive drugs), dyslipidemia (tryglicerides >2.82 mmol/l and/or HDL-cholesterol <1.03 mmol/l), hyperuricemia (uric acid >416 micromol/l) and increased albumin excretion rate (AER > or = 20 microg/min). RESULTS: Fibrinogen increases with age, HbA(1c), smoking, hypertension and a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, even after adjustment for confounders. Prevalence of CHD increases linearly across quartiles of fibrinogen (from 26.1 to 40.6%, p=0.046). However, in logistic regression, after adjustment for both confounders and known risk factors for CHD, the role of fibrinogen is no more significant, whereas ORs for HbA(1c) between 6.8 and 8.8% and >8.8% vs values <6.8% are, respectively, 1.91 (95% CI 1.36-2.69) and 1.56 (1.07-2.27). CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study shows that fibrinogen increases with age, HbA(1c), smoking, hypertension and a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, independent of major confounders. We also found that poor blood glucose control was associated with CHD.
17(2)
124
130
BRUNO G ;CAVALLO-PERIN P ;BARGERO G ;BORRA M ;D'ERRICO N ;MACCHIA G ;PAGANO G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/39740
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