Odontogenic cysts of the jaws include various pathological entities, traditionally classified into two different groups: developmental cysts (dentigerous, keratocysts, etc.) and inflammatory cysts (radicular, etc.). Radicular cysts (RCs) comprise about 52% to 68% of all the cysts affecting the human jaws, followed by dentigerous and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). OKCs are neoplastic lesions, classified by the WHO Working Group as benign tumours with odontogenic epithelium. Through the years, there have been conflicting reports regarding the presence of microorganisms in odontogenic cysts. Some studies suggest that bacteria are not found in RCs and do not normally penetrate into the lamina. Meghji et al. (1996) found higher level of endotoxin in RCs than in OKCs, but no aerobe and anaerobe bacteria with microbiologically sterile cystic fluid. However, other studies have shown that some odontogenic cysts do indeed contain microorganisms and may not be sterile. Since no exhaustive results are available in this research-area, the purpose of this study was to detect the potential bacteria into cystic fluid from non-ruptured RCs and OKCs of asyntomatic patients, with information about of the microbial load. Cystic fluids samples from RCs (12 patients) and OKCs (6 patients) were cultured in anaerobic and aerobic conditions to detect microorganisms. Cultures were positive in 17 of 18 cases within 3 weeks. Microbiological samples generally yielded mean total bacterial counts higher than or nearly close to 1x105 cfu/ml. A total of 12 different species were isolated and identified both in RCs and in OKCs fluid including facultative and obligate anaerobe groups. These data are in disagreement with Meghji et al. study showing that all the cysts fluids were negative for anaerobes after 72 h of incubation. Better knowledge about the microorganism content in jaw cyst lesions should help to improve the selection of antibiotics in oral surgery practice.

Bacterial detection in asyntomatic patient radicular cysts and odontogenic keratocysts

ROANA, Janira;SCALAS, Daniela;GALLESIO, Cesare;BANCHE, Giuliana;BOFFANO, PAOLO;MANDRAS, Narcisa;ALLIZOND, VALERIA;TULLIO, Viviana Cristina;CUFFINI, Annamaria
2011

Abstract

Odontogenic cysts of the jaws include various pathological entities, traditionally classified into two different groups: developmental cysts (dentigerous, keratocysts, etc.) and inflammatory cysts (radicular, etc.). Radicular cysts (RCs) comprise about 52% to 68% of all the cysts affecting the human jaws, followed by dentigerous and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). OKCs are neoplastic lesions, classified by the WHO Working Group as benign tumours with odontogenic epithelium. Through the years, there have been conflicting reports regarding the presence of microorganisms in odontogenic cysts. Some studies suggest that bacteria are not found in RCs and do not normally penetrate into the lamina. Meghji et al. (1996) found higher level of endotoxin in RCs than in OKCs, but no aerobe and anaerobe bacteria with microbiologically sterile cystic fluid. However, other studies have shown that some odontogenic cysts do indeed contain microorganisms and may not be sterile. Since no exhaustive results are available in this research-area, the purpose of this study was to detect the potential bacteria into cystic fluid from non-ruptured RCs and OKCs of asyntomatic patients, with information about of the microbial load. Cystic fluids samples from RCs (12 patients) and OKCs (6 patients) were cultured in anaerobic and aerobic conditions to detect microorganisms. Cultures were positive in 17 of 18 cases within 3 weeks. Microbiological samples generally yielded mean total bacterial counts higher than or nearly close to 1x105 cfu/ml. A total of 12 different species were isolated and identified both in RCs and in OKCs fluid including facultative and obligate anaerobe groups. These data are in disagreement with Meghji et al. study showing that all the cysts fluids were negative for anaerobes after 72 h of incubation. Better knowledge about the microorganism content in jaw cyst lesions should help to improve the selection of antibiotics in oral surgery practice.
39° Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Microbiologia (SIM)
Riccione
3-6 ottobre 2011
Bollettino della SIM
Società Italiana di Microbiologia (SIM)
13
152
152
Roana J; Scalas D; Amasio M; Gallesio C; Banche G; Boffano P; Mandras N; Allizond V; Tullio V; Cuffini AM
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/92547
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