Introduction. In infants, health and well-being are closely linked to the development of the intestine and its digestive and immune capacities. The type of feeding in the first months of life appears as one of the most important determinants of the child and adult well-being, and its protective action appears to be related with the ability to modulate intestinal microflora composition at early stages of life. This study aimed to determine the impact of weaning on the gut microbiota composition of infants who have different infant feeding practices. Material and methods. Fecal samples were collected from 49 infants hospitalized at the Department of Public Health and Pediatrics (Regina Margherita Children Hospital, Turin, Italy). Two groups were selected according to the different power: 0-6 months milk fed (breast, formula or mixed feeding) and 7-12 months weaned. Stool samples were collected and cultured on selective media to detect lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, enterococci and Enterobacteriaceae. The qualitative analysis was performed by Gram staining and by biochemical methods (API System). Genomic DNA from positive Escherichia coli and Cronobacter sakazakii colonies was extracted and processed by multiplex PCR assay. Results.The investigation revealed that Enterobacteriaceae did not significantly increase in breastfed infants pre-weaning (0-6 months) in comparison with formula-fed and mixed feeding, where E. coli species were predominant. Enterococci load was significantly higher in formula feeding compared with breast and mixed feeding. The Bifidobacterium spp. load was significantly lower in formula fed infants, whereas Lactobacillus spp. were higher in breastfed babies. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci increased after weaning. Enteropathogenic E.coli and C. sakazakii were predominant in formula feeding. Similar to pre-weaning, in 7-12 months group there was a higher amount of Lactobacillus spp. in breastfed babies. The Bifidobacterium spp. counts were significantly higher in breastfed infants. Discussion and conclusions. Power is an important modulator of the intestinal microbiota composition. Breastfed children have high levels of bifidobacteria and low levels of potentially pathogenic bacteria: it follows that breast milk, whose beneficial health-effects are undoubtedly unique, has to be considered the food of choice for infants in the first 6 months of life. For the same reasons, breast-feeding should be encouraged and, at the same time, new researches are advised in order to better define the composition of intestinal microbial ecosystem and the specific interactions amongst diet, microbiota composition, and children health.

Effect of different feeding regimens on infant's gut microbiota

MANDRAS, Narcisa;AMISANO, Gabriella;ROANA, Janira;FORNASERO, Stefania;ALLIZOND, VALERIA;BANCHE, Giuliana;SCALAS, Daniela;CUFFINI, Annamaria;TULLIO, Viviana Cristina
2014

Abstract

Introduction. In infants, health and well-being are closely linked to the development of the intestine and its digestive and immune capacities. The type of feeding in the first months of life appears as one of the most important determinants of the child and adult well-being, and its protective action appears to be related with the ability to modulate intestinal microflora composition at early stages of life. This study aimed to determine the impact of weaning on the gut microbiota composition of infants who have different infant feeding practices. Material and methods. Fecal samples were collected from 49 infants hospitalized at the Department of Public Health and Pediatrics (Regina Margherita Children Hospital, Turin, Italy). Two groups were selected according to the different power: 0-6 months milk fed (breast, formula or mixed feeding) and 7-12 months weaned. Stool samples were collected and cultured on selective media to detect lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, enterococci and Enterobacteriaceae. The qualitative analysis was performed by Gram staining and by biochemical methods (API System). Genomic DNA from positive Escherichia coli and Cronobacter sakazakii colonies was extracted and processed by multiplex PCR assay. Results.The investigation revealed that Enterobacteriaceae did not significantly increase in breastfed infants pre-weaning (0-6 months) in comparison with formula-fed and mixed feeding, where E. coli species were predominant. Enterococci load was significantly higher in formula feeding compared with breast and mixed feeding. The Bifidobacterium spp. load was significantly lower in formula fed infants, whereas Lactobacillus spp. were higher in breastfed babies. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci increased after weaning. Enteropathogenic E.coli and C. sakazakii were predominant in formula feeding. Similar to pre-weaning, in 7-12 months group there was a higher amount of Lactobacillus spp. in breastfed babies. The Bifidobacterium spp. counts were significantly higher in breastfed infants. Discussion and conclusions. Power is an important modulator of the intestinal microbiota composition. Breastfed children have high levels of bifidobacteria and low levels of potentially pathogenic bacteria: it follows that breast milk, whose beneficial health-effects are undoubtedly unique, has to be considered the food of choice for infants in the first 6 months of life. For the same reasons, breast-feeding should be encouraged and, at the same time, new researches are advised in order to better define the composition of intestinal microbial ecosystem and the specific interactions amongst diet, microbiota composition, and children health.
42° Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Microbiologia
Torino
30 settembre - 1 ottobre 2014
37
1
80
80
http://www.microbiologica.net
Gut microbiota, Bacterial gastroenteritis, Probiotic, Infants
Mandras, N; Amisano, G; Roana, J; Fornasero, S; Savino, F; Allizond, V; Banche, G; Scalas, D; Cuffini, AM; Tullio, V
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/153939
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