Our aim is evaluating the changes in weight and dietary habits in a sample of outpatients with obesity after 1 month of enforced lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Italy. In this observational retrospective study, the patients of our Obesity Unit were invited to answer to a 12-question multiple-choice questionnaire relative to weight changes, working activity, exercise, dietary habits, and conditions potentially impacting on nutritional choices. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations among weight/BMI changes and the analyzed variables. A total of 150 subjects (91.5%) completed the questionnaire. Mean self-reported weight gain was≈1.5 kg (p < 0.001). Lower exercise, self-reported boredom/solitude, anxiety/depression, enhanced eating, consumption of snacks, unhealthy foods, cereals, and sweets were correlated with a significantly higher weight gain. Multiple regression analyses showed that increased education (inversely, β =−1.15; 95%CI−2.13,−0.17, p = 0.022), self-reported anxiety/depression (β = 1.61; 0.53, 2.69, p = 0.004), and not consuming healthy foods (β = 1.48; 0.19, 2.77, p = 0.026) were significantly associated with increased weight gain. The estimated direct effect of self-reported anxiety/depression on weight was 2.07 kg (1.07, 3.07, p < 0.001). Individuals with obesity significantly gained weight 1 month after the beginning of the quarantine. The adverse mental burden linked to the COVID-19 pandemic was greatly associated with increased weight gain.

Changes in weight and nutritional habits in adults with obesity during the “lockdown” period caused by the COVID-19 virus emergency

Pellegrini M.;Ponzo V.;Rosato R.;Goitre I.;Benso A.;Belcastro S.;De Michieli F.;Ghigo E.;Broglio F.;Bo S.
2020

Abstract

Our aim is evaluating the changes in weight and dietary habits in a sample of outpatients with obesity after 1 month of enforced lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Italy. In this observational retrospective study, the patients of our Obesity Unit were invited to answer to a 12-question multiple-choice questionnaire relative to weight changes, working activity, exercise, dietary habits, and conditions potentially impacting on nutritional choices. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations among weight/BMI changes and the analyzed variables. A total of 150 subjects (91.5%) completed the questionnaire. Mean self-reported weight gain was≈1.5 kg (p < 0.001). Lower exercise, self-reported boredom/solitude, anxiety/depression, enhanced eating, consumption of snacks, unhealthy foods, cereals, and sweets were correlated with a significantly higher weight gain. Multiple regression analyses showed that increased education (inversely, β =−1.15; 95%CI−2.13,−0.17, p = 0.022), self-reported anxiety/depression (β = 1.61; 0.53, 2.69, p = 0.004), and not consuming healthy foods (β = 1.48; 0.19, 2.77, p = 0.026) were significantly associated with increased weight gain. The estimated direct effect of self-reported anxiety/depression on weight was 2.07 kg (1.07, 3.07, p < 0.001). Individuals with obesity significantly gained weight 1 month after the beginning of the quarantine. The adverse mental burden linked to the COVID-19 pandemic was greatly associated with increased weight gain.
12
7
1
11
COVID-19 infection; Dietary habits; Lockdown; Obesity; Adult; Betacoronavirus; Body Mass Index; Coronavirus Infections; Feeding Behavior; Female; Humans; Italy; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity; Pandemics; Pneumonia, Viral; Quarantine; Regression Analysis; Retrospective Studies; Weight Gain
Pellegrini M.; Ponzo V.; Rosato R.; Scumaci E.; Goitre I.; Benso A.; Belcastro S.; Crespi C.; De Michieli F.; Ghigo E.; Broglio F.; Bo S.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
nutrients-12-02016 (1).pdf

Accesso aperto

Tipo di file: PDF EDITORIALE
Dimensione 244.46 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
244.46 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1750026
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 167
  • Scopus 238
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 221
social impact