Background: Antimicrobial de-escalation (ADE) is a part of antimicrobial stewardship strategies aiming to minimize unnecessary or inappropriate antibiotic exposure to decrease the rate of antimicrobial resistance. Information regarding the effectiveness and safety of ADE in the setting of emergency medicine wards (EMW) is lacking. Methods: Adult patients admitted to EMW and receiving empiric antimicrobial treatment were retrospectively studied. The primary outcome was the rate and timing of ADE. Secondary outcomes included factors associated with early ADE, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Results: A total of 336 patients were studied. An initial regimen combining two agents was prescribed in 54.8%. Ureidopenicillins and carbapenems were the most frequently empiric treatment prescribed (25.1% and 13.6%). The rate of the appropriateness of prescribing was 58.3%. De-escalation was performed in 111 (33%) patients. Patients received a successful de-escalation on day 2 (21%), 3 (23%), and 5 (56%). The overall in-hospital mortality was 21%, and it was significantly lower among the de-escalation group than the continuation group (16% vs 25% p = 0.003). In multivariate analysis, de-escalation strategies as well as appropriate empiric and targeted therapy were associated with reduced mortality. Conclusions: ADE appears safe and effective in the setting of EMWs despite that further research is warranted to confirm these findings.

Antibiotic de-escalation experience in the setting of emergency department: A retrospective, observational study

Corcione S.;Mornese Pinna S.;Lupia T.;Trentalange A.;Germano E.;Cavallo R.;Lupia E.;De Rosa F. G.
2021

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial de-escalation (ADE) is a part of antimicrobial stewardship strategies aiming to minimize unnecessary or inappropriate antibiotic exposure to decrease the rate of antimicrobial resistance. Information regarding the effectiveness and safety of ADE in the setting of emergency medicine wards (EMW) is lacking. Methods: Adult patients admitted to EMW and receiving empiric antimicrobial treatment were retrospectively studied. The primary outcome was the rate and timing of ADE. Secondary outcomes included factors associated with early ADE, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Results: A total of 336 patients were studied. An initial regimen combining two agents was prescribed in 54.8%. Ureidopenicillins and carbapenems were the most frequently empiric treatment prescribed (25.1% and 13.6%). The rate of the appropriateness of prescribing was 58.3%. De-escalation was performed in 111 (33%) patients. Patients received a successful de-escalation on day 2 (21%), 3 (23%), and 5 (56%). The overall in-hospital mortality was 21%, and it was significantly lower among the de-escalation group than the continuation group (16% vs 25% p = 0.003). In multivariate analysis, de-escalation strategies as well as appropriate empiric and targeted therapy were associated with reduced mortality. Conclusions: ADE appears safe and effective in the setting of EMWs despite that further research is warranted to confirm these findings.
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Antibiotic treatment; Antimicrobial stewardship; Bloodstream infection; De-escalation; Emergency department
Corcione S.; Mornese Pinna S.; Lupia T.; Trentalange A.; Germano E.; Cavallo R.; Lupia E.; De Rosa F.G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2318/1815699
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