Coffee cupping includes both aroma and taste, and its evaluation considers several different attributes simultaneously to define flavor quality and therefore requires complementary data from aroma and taste. This study investigates the potential and limits of a data-driven approach to describe the sensory quality of coffee using complementary analytical techniques usually available in routine quality control laboratories. Coffee flavor chemical data from 155 samples were obtained by analyzing volatile (headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS)) and nonvolatile (liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/diode array detector (LC-UV/DAD)) fractions, as well as from sensory data. Chemometric tools were used to explore the data sets, select relevant features, predict sensory scores, and investigate the networks between features. A comparison of the Q model parameter and root-mean-squared error prediction (RMSEP) highlights the variable influence that the nonvolatile fraction has on prediction, showing that it has a higher impact on describing acid, bitter, and woody notes than on flowery and fruity. The data fusion emphasized the aroma contribution to driving sensory perceptions, although the correlative networks highlighted from the volatile and nonvolatile data deserve a thorough investigation to verify the potential of odor-taste integration.

Chromatographic Fingerprinting Strategy to Delineate Chemical Patterns Correlated to Coffee Odor and Taste Attributes

Bressanello D.;Marengo A.;Cordero C.;Strocchi G.;Rubiolo P.;Ruosi M. R.;Bicchi C.;Liberto E.
2021

Abstract

Coffee cupping includes both aroma and taste, and its evaluation considers several different attributes simultaneously to define flavor quality and therefore requires complementary data from aroma and taste. This study investigates the potential and limits of a data-driven approach to describe the sensory quality of coffee using complementary analytical techniques usually available in routine quality control laboratories. Coffee flavor chemical data from 155 samples were obtained by analyzing volatile (headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS)) and nonvolatile (liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/diode array detector (LC-UV/DAD)) fractions, as well as from sensory data. Chemometric tools were used to explore the data sets, select relevant features, predict sensory scores, and investigate the networks between features. A comparison of the Q model parameter and root-mean-squared error prediction (RMSEP) highlights the variable influence that the nonvolatile fraction has on prediction, showing that it has a higher impact on describing acid, bitter, and woody notes than on flowery and fruity. The data fusion emphasized the aroma contribution to driving sensory perceptions, although the correlative networks highlighted from the volatile and nonvolatile data deserve a thorough investigation to verify the potential of odor-taste integration.
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https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.1c00509
chemometrics; coffee; HS-SPME-GC-MS; LC-UV/DAD; sensory data; Coffee; Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry; Solid Phase Microextraction; Taste; Odorants; Volatile Organic Compounds
Bressanello D.; Marengo A.; Cordero C.; Strocchi G.; Rubiolo P.; Pellegrino G.; Ruosi M.R.; Bicchi C.; Liberto E.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2318/1799264
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